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dc.coverage.spatialSite: Paris, Île-de-France, Franceen_US
dc.coverage.temporalconsecrated 1842 (other); designed 1807 (design)en_US
dc.creatorVignon, Pierreen_US
dc.date1842en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-25T21:47:36Z
dc.date.available2013-01-25T21:47:36Z
dc.date.issued1842en_US
dc.identifier186497en_US
dc.identifier.otherarchrefid: 1653en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.3/95691
dc.descriptionFrom 1806 Vignon concentrated on completing the Madeleine, a church that had remained unfinished since the days of the ancien régime. In 1806 Napoleon ordered that a Temple de la Gloire de la Grande Armée should be erected there and Claude-Etienne Beaumont (1757-1811) emerged as winner of the limited competition (1807), but he was superseded by Vignon on Napoleon’s orders. He designed a vast peripteral Corinthian temple, with a single huge, barrel-vaulted interior, to form a counterpart to the distant Chambre des Députés by Bernard Poyet. Building work, however, never started; in 1815, Louis XVIII contemplated using the site for the Chapelle expiatoire dedicated to Louis XVI and another competition was held (1816), to which Vignon contributed. The enterprise was judged too expensive and it was decided to build the Madeleine as a parish church. Vignon retained the commission using his designs of 1807, subject to modifications, which included roofing the nave with three domes. The masonry of the exterior was virtually finished by 1828 when Vignon died, and the completion of the interior (1828-1842) was supervised by Jean-Jacques Huvé (1783-1852).; From 1806 Vignon concentrated on completing the Madeleine, a church that had remained unfinished since the days of the ancien régime. In 1806 Napoleon ordered that a Temple de la Gloire de la Grande Armée should be erected there and Claude-Etienne Beaumont (1757-1811) emerged as winner of the limited competition (1807), but he was superseded by Vignon on Napoleon’s orders. He designed a vast peripteral Corinthian temple, with a single huge, barrel-vaulted interior, to form a counterpart to the distant Chambre des Députés by Bernard Poyet. Building work, however, never started; in 1815, Louis XVIII contemplated using the site for the Chapelle expiatoire dedicated to Louis XVI and another competition was held (1816), to which Vignon contributed. The enterprise was judged too expensive and it was decided to build the Madeleine as a parish church. Vignon retained the commission using his designs of 1807, subject to modifications, which included roofing the nave with three domes. The masonry of the exterior was virtually finished by 1828 when Vignon died, and the completion of the interior (1828-1842) was supervised by Jean-Jacques Huvé (1783-1852). Source: Grove Art Online; http://www.oxfordartonline.com/ (accessed 12/16/2008)en_US
dc.format.mediumstoneen_US
dc.rights© Scott Gilchrist, Archivision, Inc.en_US
dc.subjectarchitectural exteriorsen_US
dc.subjectrulers and leadersen_US
dc.subjectNapoleon I, Emperor of the French, 1769-1821en_US
dc.subjectNapoleonic Wars, 1800-1815en_US
dc.subjectNeoclassicalen_US
dc.subjectNineteenth centuryen_US
dc.titleLa Madeleineen_US
dc.title.alternativeÉglise de la Madeleineen_US
dc.title.alternativeL'église Sainte-Marie-Madeleineen_US
dc.typeimageen_US
dc.rights.accessLicensed for educational and research use by the MIT community onlyen_US
dc.identifier.vendorcode1A2-F-P-M-A2en_US
vra.culturalContextFrenchen_US
vra.techniqueconstruction (assembling)en_US
vra.worktypechurchen_US
vra.worktypememorialen_US
dc.contributor.displayPierre Vignon (French architect, 1763-1828)en_US


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