Show simple item record

dc.coverage.spatialSite: Paris, Île-de-France, Franceen_US
dc.coverage.temporal1671-1674 (creation)en_US
dc.creatorBruand, Libéralen_US
dc.creatorMansart, Jules Hardouinen_US
dc.date1671-1674en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-25T21:46:27Z
dc.date.available2013-01-25T21:46:27Z
dc.date.issued1671-1674en_US
dc.identifier186454en_US
dc.identifier.otherarchrefid: 1897en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.3/95648
dc.descriptionMarquis de Louvois (1641-1691), invited Bruand in 1670 to submit a design for a veterans’ hospital and home to be built in Paris. Construction began in 1671 and proceeded rapidly; by 1674 the Invalides was sufficiently complete for it to be dedicated and partially occupied. Unfortunately, the relationship between Louvois and Bruand deteriorated amid allegations of falsified accounts and Bruand’s alleged orders for unauthorized changes, and after 1675 Jules Hardouin Mansart effectively displaced Bruand as principal architect. The Hôtel looks like a huge barracks, with a four-storey façade, without order, punctuated between its pavilions only by the series of verticals that mark the bays of the secondary entrances; but on the royal courtyard, the elevation, reduced to two levels of arcades corresponding to the open circulation galleries, achieves nobility in its sobriety.; Marquis de Louvois (1641-1691), invited Bruand in 1670 to submit a design for a veterans’ hospital and home to be built in Paris. Construction began in 1671 and proceeded rapidly; by 1674 the Invalides was sufficiently complete for it to be dedicated and partially occupied. Unfortunately, the relationship between Louvois and Bruand deteriorated amid allegations of falsified accounts and Bruand’s alleged orders for unauthorized changes, and after 1675 Jules Hardouin Mansart effectively displaced Bruand as principal architect. The Hôtel looks like a huge barracks, with a four-storey façade, without order, punctuated between its pavilions only by the series of verticals that mark the bays of the secondary entrances; but on the royal courtyard, the elevation, reduced to two levels of arcades corresponding to the open circulation galleries, achieves nobility in its sobriety. Source: Grove Art Online; http://www.oxfordartonline.com/ (accessed 6/21/2009)en_US
dc.format.mediumstoneen_US
dc.rights© Scott Gilchrist, Archivision, Inc.en_US
dc.subjectarchitectural exteriorsen_US
dc.subjectdeath or burialen_US
dc.subjecthistoricalen_US
dc.subjectmilitaryen_US
dc.subjectwaren_US
dc.subjectrulers and leadersen_US
dc.subjectLouis XIV, King of France, 1638-1715en_US
dc.subjectbarracksen_US
dc.subjecthostelen_US
dc.subjectpensionersen_US
dc.subjectretireesen_US
dc.subjectveteransen_US
dc.subjectBaroqueen_US
dc.subjectMannerist (Renaissance-Baroque style)en_US
dc.subjectSeventeenth centuryen_US
dc.titleInvalides: Hôtel des Invalidesen_US
dc.title.alternativeHôtel des Invalidesen_US
dc.typeimageen_US
dc.rights.accessLicensed for educational and research use by the MIT community onlyen_US
dc.identifier.vendorcode1A2-F-P-I-3-A2en_US
vra.culturalContextFrenchen_US
vra.techniqueconstruction (assembling)en_US
vra.worktypehistoric siteen_US
vra.worktypechurchen_US
vra.worktypehospitalen_US
vra.worktypedormitory (building)en_US
dc.contributor.displayJules Hardouin Mansart (French architect, 1646-1708); Libéral Bruand (French architect, ca.1635-1697)en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record