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dc.coverage.spatialSite: Paris, Île-de-France, Franceen_US
dc.coverage.temporal1676-1735 (creation); 1840-1861 (alteration)en_US
dc.creatorMansart, Jules Hardouinen_US
dc.date1676-1735en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-25T21:46:01Z
dc.date.available2013-01-25T21:46:01Z
dc.date.issued1676-1735en_US
dc.identifier186438en_US
dc.identifier.otherarchrefid: 608en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.3/95632
dc.descriptionIn 1676 he was commissioned to build the church of the Hôtel des Invalides, after Libéral Bruand, who designed the rest of the complex, failed to produce a satisfactory scheme. For this almost monastic establishment for disabled soldiers, Hardouin Mansart created a bipartite building: the first part [Église St-Louis], a nine-bay nave for the pensioners, has a barrel vault and side aisles with tribunes opening through flattened arches, following 17th-century French models. The second part, beyond, is the 'great church', the Dôme, in the form of a Greek cross inscribed in a square and vaulted by a dome on a drum--a plan that Hardouin Mansart borrowed from his great-uncle's [François] designs for the 'rotunda' Bourbon chapel at Saint-Denis Abbey. The exterior of the church was conceived to give maximum emphasis to the dome, which dominates all the other buildings of the Invalides as well as the church itself. This was achieved by the insertion of an attic storey over the drum and by the graceful silhouette of the outer dome, with its extremely tall lantern and crowning obelisk, together reaching more than 100 m above the ground. The interior was renovated from 1840-1861; Napoleon's body was brought back from Saint Helena in 1840.; In 1676 he was commissioned to build the church of the Hôtel des Invalides, after Libéral Bruand, who designed the rest of the complex, failed to produce a satisfactory scheme. For this almost monastic establishment for disabled soldiers, Hardouin Mansart created a bipartite building: the first part [Église St-Louis], a nine-bay nave for the pensioners, has a barrel vault and side aisles with tribunes opening through flattened arches, following 17th-century French models. The second part, beyond, is the 'great church', the Dôme, in the form of a Greek cross inscribed in a square and vaulted by a dome on a drum--a plan that Hardouin Mansart borrowed from his great-uncle's [François] designs for the 'rotunda' Bourbon chapel at Saint-Denis Abbey. The exterior of the church was conceived to give maximum emphasis to the dome, which dominates all the other buildings of the Invalides as well as the church itself. This was achieved by the insertion of an attic storey over the drum and by the graceful silhouette of the outer dome, with its extremely tall lantern and crowning obelisk, together reaching more than 100 m above the ground. The interior was renovated from 1840-1861; Napoleon's body was brought back from Saint Helena in 1840. Source: Grove Art Online; http://www.groveart.com/ (accessed 12/2/2007)en_US
dc.format.mediumstoneen_US
dc.rights© Scott Gilchrist, Archivision, Inc.en_US
dc.subjectarchitectural exteriorsen_US
dc.subjectmilitaryen_US
dc.subjectwaren_US
dc.subjectLouis XIV, King of France, 1638-1715en_US
dc.subjectNapoleon I, Emperor of the French, 1769-1821en_US
dc.subjectBaroqueen_US
dc.subjectEighteenth centuryen_US
dc.titleInvalides: Église du Domeen_US
dc.title.alternativeDôme des Invalidesen_US
dc.typeimageen_US
dc.rights.accessLicensed for educational and research use by the MIT community onlyen_US
dc.identifier.vendorcode1A2-F-P-I-1-B3en_US
vra.culturalContextFrenchen_US
vra.techniqueconstruction (assembling)en_US
vra.worktypechurchen_US
vra.worktypesepulchral chapelen_US
dc.contributor.displayJules Hardouin Mansart (French architect, 1646-1708)en_US


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