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dc.coverage.spatialSite: London, England, United Kingdomen_US
dc.coverage.temporalca. 1769-1835 (creation)en_US
dc.creatorCoade, Eleanoren_US
dc.date1769-1835en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-25T21:24:51Z
dc.date.available2013-01-25T21:24:51Z
dc.date.issued1769-1835en_US
dc.identifier186355en_US
dc.identifier.otherarchrefid: 1764en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.3/95549
dc.descriptionFrom 1769 ‘Mrs’ Coade (adopting a courtesy title extended to unmarried women in business) manufactured a ceramic artificial stone at Lambeth in London. It so closely resembled a natural stone that ever since it has been mistaken for it; as a result the extent of her influential business has been greatly underestimated. It survives at more than 650 sites, and hundreds more examples of its use have been recorded. The Coade Artificial Stone Manufactory produced every kind of architectural detail: capitals, friezes, quoins, voussoirs; garden ornaments, including fountains, statues and vases. From 1771 the sculptor John Bacon (i) was employed as chief designer; other sculptors, such as John Flaxman and Thomas Banks, were later involved in occasional employment by Coade. These urns are covered with motifs and figures borrowed from Classical Greek art.; From 1769 ‘Mrs’ Coade (adopting a courtesy title extended to unmarried women in business) manufactured a ceramic artificial stone at Lambeth in London. It so closely resembled a natural stone that ever since it has been mistaken for it; as a result the extent of her influential business has been greatly underestimated. It survives at more than 650 sites, and hundreds more examples of its use have been recorded. The Coade Artificial Stone Manufactory produced every kind of architectural detail: capitals, friezes, quoins, voussoirs; garden ornaments, including fountains, statues and vases. From 1771 the sculptor John Bacon (i) was employed as chief designer; other sculptors, such as John Flaxman and Thomas Banks, were later involved in occasional employment by Coade. These urns are covered with motifs and figures borrowed from Classical Greek art. Source: Grove Art Online; http://www.oxfordartonline.com/ (accessed 6/14/2009)en_US
dc.format.mediumCoade stone (ceramic artificial stone)en_US
dc.rights© Scott Gilchrist, Archivision, Inc.en_US
dc.subjectdecorative artsen_US
dc.subjectmythology (Classical)en_US
dc.subjectEighteenth centuryen_US
dc.subjectNeoclassicalen_US
dc.titleChiswick House: Italian Garden Urn Reliefsen_US
dc.typeimageen_US
dc.rights.accessLicensed for educational and research use by the MIT community onlyen_US
dc.identifier.vendorcode1A2-E-L-CH-3-A6en_US
vra.culturalContextBritishen_US
vra.techniquecarving (processes) casting (process) fabrication attributes: ceramicsen_US
vra.worktypeurnen_US
vra.worktypebas-relief (sculpture)en_US
dc.contributor.displayEleanor Coade (British manufacturer, 1732-1821)en_US


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