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dc.coverage.spatialSite: Montréal, Québec, Canadaen_US
dc.coverage.temporalca. 1850-1960 (inclusive)en_US
dc.creatorunknownen_US
dc.date1850-1960en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-25T21:00:49Z
dc.date.available2013-01-25T21:00:49Z
dc.date.issued1850-1960en_US
dc.identifier185977en_US
dc.identifier.otherarchrefid: 1916en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.3/95171
dc.descriptionAlthough the square is one of the oldest developed parts of the city, dating back to 1693, the present-day configuration and dimensions of Place d’Armes correspond approximately to those of the layout begun in 1845 and completed in 1850. The great urban renewal begun in the 1950s also led to changes in Place d’Armes before the city undertook the final, most significant redevelopment of the Place in about 1960. Strangely, no documents relative to this layout seem to have survived in the City of Montréal archives. One of the salient features of the 1960s redevelopment was the raising of the Place by approximately 75 cm above the surrounding sidewalks and streets. Access is by low steps at the four corners. There is another, much wider, step on the side of the Place facing the Notre-Dame Basilica. Functionally speaking, this “pedestalization” restricted access by mobility-impaired people, and encased the base of the sculpture/fountain. The square is to be re-designed and re-developed in 2010.; Although the square is one of the oldest developed parts of the city, dating back to 1693, the present-day configuration and dimensions of Place d’Armes correspond approximately to those of the layout begun in 1845 and completed in 1850. The great urban renewal begun in the 1950s also led to changes in Place d’Armes before the city undertook the final, most significant redevelopment of the Place in about 1960. Strangely, no documents relative to this layout seem to have survived in the City of Montréal archives. One of the salient features of the 1960s redevelopment was the raising of the Place by approximately 75 cm above the surrounding sidewalks and streets. Access is by low steps at the four corners. There is another, much wider, step on the side of the Place facing the Notre-Dame Basilica. Functionally speaking, this “pedestalization” restricted access by mobility-impaired people, and encased the base of the sculpture/fountain. The square is to be re-designed and re-developed in 2010. Source: Old Montréal; Vieux-Montréal [website]; http://www.vieux.montreal.qc.ca/ (accessed 6/20/2009)en_US
dc.format.mediumstone; brick; pavingen_US
dc.rights© Scott Gilchrist, Archivision, Inc.en_US
dc.subjectarchitectural exteriorsen_US
dc.subjectcityscapesen_US
dc.subjectcontemporary (1960 to present)en_US
dc.subjectCity planningen_US
dc.subjecturban renewalen_US
dc.subjectpedestrian accessen_US
dc.subjecthandicapped accessibilityen_US
dc.subjectTwentieth centuryen_US
dc.titlePlace d'Armesen_US
dc.typeimageen_US
dc.rights.accessLicensed for educational and research use by the MIT community onlyen_US
dc.identifier.vendorcode1A2-C-M-PA-B5en_US
vra.culturalContextCanadianen_US
vra.techniqueconstruction (assembling)en_US
vra.worktypesquare (open space)en_US
dc.contributor.displayunknown (Canadian)en_US


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