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dc.coverage.spatialSite: Tokyo, Kanto, Japanen_US
dc.coverage.temporal2003 (creation)en_US
dc.creatorHerzog & de Meuronen_US
dc.date2003en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-29T17:35:07Z
dc.date.available2013-07-29T17:35:07Z
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier227349en_US
dc.identifier.otherarchrefid: 2442en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.3/135132
dc.descriptionDetail, building base and its grid and glass structure; Prada's Tokyo “epicenter”, in the fashionable Aoyama district, is the company's second radical approach to fashion-store architecture, following Rem Koolhaas’ flagship store in New York. The Tokyo store is a strikingly unconventional 6-story glass crystal that is soft despite its sharp angles – as a result of its five-sided shape, the smooth curves throughout its interior, and its signature diamond-shaped glass panes, which vary between flat, concave and convex “bubbles”. Jacques Herzog describes these glass panes as “an interactive optical device." Source: Galinsky [website]; http://www.galinsky.com/ (accessed 5/4/2011)en_US
dc.format.mediumglass; steelen_US
dc.rights© Scott Gilchrist, Archivision, Inc.en_US
dc.subjectTwenty-first centuryen_US
dc.titlePrada Tokyoen_US
dc.typeimageen_US
dc.rights.accessLicensed for educational and research use by the MIT community onlyen_US
dc.identifier.vendorcode1A1-HDM-PS-B1en_US
vra.culturalContextJapaneseen_US
vra.techniqueconstruction (assembling)en_US
vra.worktypedepartment storeen_US
dc.contributor.displayHerzog & de Meuron (Swiss architectural firm, founded 1978)en_US


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