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dc.coverage.spatialSite: University of Virginia (Charlottesville, Virginia, United States)en_US
dc.coverage.temporalca. 1819-present (creation)en_US
dc.creatorJefferson, Thomasen_US
dc.date1819-2050en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-07T14:06:13Z
dc.date.available2013-05-07T14:06:13Z
dc.date.issued1819-2050en_US
dc.identifier213204en_US
dc.identifier.otherarchrefid: 109en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.3/120695
dc.descriptionGeneral view of the East Pavilion Gardens, depicting south wall; Flanking both sides of the Rotunda and extending down the length of the Lawn are 10 Pavilions interspersed with student rooms. Each has its own classical architectural style, as well as its own walled garden separated by Jeffersonian Serpentine walls. These walls are called "serpentine" because they run a sinusoidal course, one that lends strength to the wall and allows for the wall to be only one brick thick, one of many innovations by which Jefferson attempted to combine aesthetics with utility. The two courses of gardens are called the East Gardens (running behind Pavilions II, IV, VI, VIII and X) and the West Gardens (running behind Pavilions I, III, V, VII and IX). Source: Wikipedia; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page (accessed 1/2/2008)en_US
dc.format.mediumbrick; wooden_US
dc.rights© Scott Gilchrist, Archivision, Inc.en_US
dc.subjectarchitectural exteriorsen_US
dc.subjectplantsen_US
dc.subjectNineteenth centuryen_US
dc.titleEast Pavilion Gardensen_US
dc.typeimageen_US
dc.rights.accessLicensed for educational and research use by the MIT community onlyen_US
dc.identifier.vendorcode1A1-JT-UV-4-A4en_US
vra.culturalContextAmericanen_US
vra.techniquegardeningen_US
vra.worktypegardenen_US
dc.contributor.displayThomas Jefferson (American landscape architect, 1743-1826)en_US


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