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dc.coverage.spatialSite: Monticello (Albemarle, Virginia, United States)en_US
dc.coverage.temporal1768-1826 (creation)en_US
dc.creatorJefferson, Thomasen_US
dc.date1768-1826en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-29T18:13:55Z
dc.date.available2013-04-29T18:13:55Z
dc.date.issued1768-1826en_US
dc.identifier213049en_US
dc.identifier.otherarchrefid: 104en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.3/120454
dc.descriptionSouth path, view looking over the flowerbeds; The main house was augmented by small outlying pavilions to the north and south. A row of functional buildings (dairy, wash houses, store houses, a small nail factory, a joinery etc.) and slave dwellings known as Mulberry Row lay nearby to the south. A stone weaver's cottage survives, as does the tall chimney of the joinery, and the foundations of other buildings. The gardens at Monticello were a botanic showpiece, a source of food, and an experimental laboratory of ornamental and useful plants from around the world. The flower gardens virtually disappeared after Jefferson's death in 1826; however, they were revived and restored by The Garden Club of Virginia between 1939 and 1941. The ensuing restoration seems unusually accurate, especially considering the state of the art of landscape and garden restoration at the time.en_US
dc.rights© Scott Gilchrist, Archivision, Inc.en_US
dc.subjectarchitectural exteriorsen_US
dc.subjectplantsen_US
dc.subjectGardensen_US
dc.subjectNeoclassicalen_US
dc.titleMonticello Gardensen_US
dc.typeimageen_US
dc.rights.accessLicensed for educational and research use by the MIT community onlyen_US
dc.identifier.vendorcode1A1-JT-ML-D6en_US
vra.culturalContextAmericanen_US
vra.techniqueconstruction (assembling)en_US
vra.worktypegarden structureen_US
vra.worktypegardenen_US
dc.contributor.displayThomas Jefferson (American landscape architect, 1743-1826)en_US


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