Show simple item record

dc.coverage.spatialSite: Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller Empire State Plaza (Albany, New York, United States)en_US
dc.coverage.temporal1965-1978 (creation)en_US
dc.creatorHarrison and Abramovitzen_US
dc.creatorHarrison, Wallace Kirkmanen_US
dc.date1965-1978en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-29T17:48:12Z
dc.date.available2013-04-29T17:48:12Z
dc.date.issued1965-1978en_US
dc.identifier212865en_US
dc.identifier.otherarchrefid: 95en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.3/120270
dc.descriptionNew York State Fallen Firefighters Memorial (1998), located in the northeast section of the complex; The complex consists of ten buildings set up on a 6-story platform, which forms the plaza. The long passageway with three reflecting pools along the length is bordered on the west by the four Agency buildings and on the east by the tall Corning Tower and the so-called Egg. "The Cultural Education Center, raised on its own platform, is at the south end while the 19th century State Capitol closes off the north end. Originally called the Empire State Plaza but later renamed for the governor who initiated the project, this complex is one of the most ambitious urban renewal projects in modern U. S. history. It was initially controversial for a number of reasons: the displacement of thousands of residents and small businesses, the cost (including the use of luxury materials like the omnipresent marble sheathing), and the inefficient use of space. While these practical criticisms have largely dissipated, particularly since the plaza is a huge tourist attraction as well as important for local use, still the complex is often criticized on aesthetic grounds. The architecture is described as outmoded and the buildings as pompous. And worse, some critics see symbolic links to Fascist architecture and centralized powerful governments. Robert Hughes, for example, in The Shock of the New, calls its style the "International Power Style of the Fifties." Others, however, praise the complex of buildings for not being trendy and predict this architecture will stand the test of time." Source: Digital Imaging Project, Mary Ann Sullivan, Bluffton University; http://www.bluffton.edu/~sullivanm/ (accessed 1/1/2008)en_US
dc.format.mediumconcrete; steelen_US
dc.rights© Scott Gilchrist, Archivision, Inc.en_US
dc.subjectarchitectural exteriorsen_US
dc.subjectcontemporary (1960 to present)en_US
dc.subjectCity planningen_US
dc.subjectModernisten_US
dc.titleGovernor Nelson A. Rockefeller Empire State Plazaen_US
dc.title.alternativeEmpire State Plazaen_US
dc.typeimageen_US
dc.rights.accessLicensed for educational and research use by the MIT community onlyen_US
dc.identifier.vendorcode1A1-HW-ES-G2en_US
vra.culturalContextAmericanen_US
vra.techniqueconstruction (assembling)en_US
vra.worktypelegislative buildingen_US
vra.worktypemuseumen_US
vra.worktypeconcert hallen_US
dc.contributor.displayHarrison and Abramovitz (American architectural firm, 1945-1976); Wallace Kirkman Harrison (American architect, 1895-1981)en_US


Files in this item

486.7Kb
JPEG image
1.823Mb
JPEG image
22.12Kb
JPEG image

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record