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dc.coverage.spatialSite: Egyptian Museum (Cairo, Urban, Egypt)en_US
dc.coverage.spatialSite: Egyptian Museum (Cairo, Urban, Egypt)en_US
dc.coverage.temporalca. 1332-1322 BCE (creation)en_US
dc.creatorunknownen_US
dc.creatorTutankhamenen_US
dc.date-1332--1322en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-23T19:21:41Z
dc.date.available2013-04-23T19:21:41Z
dc.date.issued-1332--1322en_US
dc.identifier210520en_US
dc.identifier.otherarchrefid: 1008en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.3/118545
dc.descriptionOne of the shrines, detail of decorative work (gessoed wood covered with gold and incised); Just behind the blocking of the Burial Chamber entrance in the Tomb of Tutankhamun, Howard Carter and his assistants were met by what appeared to be a wall of gilded wood inlaid with dazzling blue faience. What they were actually seeing was the outermost of a group of nested shrines that protected the king's sarcophagus. It was a carefully built construct mostly built of cedar and held together by tenons of oak and bronze. Within this shrine were contained a pall frame, a second, third and fourth inner shrine and then the sarcophagus. Each shrine was copper-bound at its lower edge and fitted at its eastern end with double folding doors. The doors were held shut by ebony bolts sliding within massive, silver-coated staples. Two other staples on each door were intended to receive a cord binding and seal. The first, outer shrine (Carter number 207) is decorated with double tyet-knot amulets of Isis and djed (stability) hieroglyphs of Osiris, all set against a brilliant blue faience background. The second and third shrines appear to imitate, in its basic form, the shape of the Per-wer, the ancient shrine of Upper Egypt. The final, innermost of the four shrines measures 2.90 meters deep by 1.48 meters wide and 1.9 meters high. It was constructed from only five separate sections. It may be a reconstruction in miniature of the prehistoric 'Palace of the North', the Per-nu. Source: Tour Egypt; http://www.touregypt.net/ (accessed 1/17/2008)en_US
dc.format.mediumgessoed wood (cedarwood) covered with golden_US
dc.rights© Scott Gilchrist, Archivision, Inc.en_US
dc.subjectdeath or burialen_US
dc.subjectdecorative artsen_US
dc.subjectrulers and leadersen_US
dc.subjectTutankhamen, King of Egypten_US
dc.subjectEighteenth Dynastyen_US
dc.subjectNew Kingdom (Egyptian)en_US
dc.titleFour Golden Shrines of Tutankamen's Burial Chamberen_US
dc.typeimageen_US
dc.rights.accessLicensed for educational and research use by the MIT community onlyen_US
dc.identifier.vendorcode7A3-EG-C-CM-2-B9en_US
vra.culturalContextEgyptian (ancient)en_US
vra.techniqueconstruction (assembling) carving (processes)en_US
vra.worktypeshrine (structure)en_US
dc.contributor.displayTutankhamen (Egyptian (ancient) patron, reigned ca. 1332-ca. 1323 BCE); unknown (Egyptian (ancient))en_US


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