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dc.coverage.spatialSite: Cairo, Urban, Egypten_US
dc.coverage.temporal876-879 (creation)en_US
dc.creatorunknownen_US
dc.date876-879en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-23T18:55:09Z
dc.date.available2013-04-23T18:55:09Z
dc.date.issued876-879en_US
dc.identifier210210en_US
dc.identifier.otherarchrefid: 1000en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.3/118235
dc.descriptionGeneral view of the sahn (court), looking southwest; The mosque of Ahmad ibn Tulun comprises a vast courtyard (92 x 92 m) surrounded by wooden-roofed arcades, five aisles deep on the qibla side and two on each of the other sides, the whole enclosed in a walled precinct (Arabic: ziyada; 122 x 140 m) on three sides. Features such as the precinct, the use of brick, the stucco decoration of the arcades and the helicoidal form of the original minaret that stood in the precinct opposite the mihrab derive from contemporary Abbasid architecture in Iraq, but the basic form of the mosque does not resemble either of the mosques at Samarra, the Abbasid capital. Wooden lintels are carved in the Bevelled style popular in many media at Samarra, and narrow wooden friezes of Koranic inscriptions in kufic script decorated the interior. Most of the stucco window grilles date from the restoration of the mosque in 1296 by the Mamluk ruler Lajin (reigned 1297-1299), when the domed pavilion in the centre of the court and the present minaret were built. Nevertheless the basic form of the mosque has remained relatively unaltered. The precinct still isolates the prayer-hall from the noise of the surrounding city, and the resulting peace encourages contemplation of the beauty of the architecture. The harmonious proportions and the multiplication of the single arched unit into endless vistas allowed by the vast size of the hypostyle plan result in a building that many deem the aesthetic highpoint of architecture not only in Cairo but in the entire Islamic world. Source: Grove Art Online; http://www.groveart.com/ (accessed 1/18/2008)en_US
dc.format.mediumbricken_US
dc.rights© Scott Gilchrist, Archivision, Inc.en_US
dc.subjectarchitectural exteriorsen_US
dc.subjectrulers and leadersen_US
dc.subjectTuluniden_US
dc.titleMosque of Ibn Tulunen_US
dc.title.alternativeMosque of Ahmad ibn Tulunen_US
dc.typeimageen_US
dc.rights.accessLicensed for educational and research use by the MIT community onlyen_US
dc.identifier.vendorcode1A3-I-E-MIT-C1en_US
vra.culturalContextEgyptian (modern) Islamicen_US
vra.techniqueconstruction (assembling)en_US
vra.worktypemosqueen_US
dc.contributor.displayunknown (Egyptian (modern))en_US


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