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dc.coverage.spatialSite: Medinet Habu, Upper Egypt, Egypten_US
dc.coverage.temporalca. 1187-1156 BCE (creation)en_US
dc.creatorunknownen_US
dc.date-1187--1156en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-23T18:52:23Z
dc.date.available2013-04-23T18:52:23Z
dc.date.issued-1187--1156en_US
dc.identifier210093en_US
dc.identifier.otherarchrefid: 771en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.3/118118
dc.descriptionView looking up into the portico of the Second Court, showing deeply carved reliefs; Medinet Habu is the site of a temple complex at the southern end of the Theban necropolis, on the west bank of the Nile. It consists of several buildings within an enclosure, dominated by the 'Great Temple' of Ramesses III [reigned ca. 1187-1156 BCE]. This structure is set within a double girdle wall originally pierced by two gates. The western gate was destroyed in a siege, but the perfectly preserved gate on the east is of considerable architectural interest, being a full-scale model of a fortified tower, reproducing a number of its defensive features. Responsiveness to foreign influence is best exemplified by the eastern gate at Medinet Habu, built in imitation of a Syrian fortified tower or migdol, though it does not seem to have had any military purpose. Reliefs and sculptures in the round on its outer walls portray the King triumphing over foreign enemies; but the scenes inside the tower, which show Ramesses III with his court ladies, suggest a domestic function for these apartments. The temple itself is the best preserved of its kind in Thebes and exemplifies many of the classic features of a royal mortuary temple. Its massive pylons and outer walls are covered with reliefs extolling the King's prowess in battle...At the south end of the first court a royal 'Window of Appearances' (through which the king appeared to his subjects) connects the court with the palace outside. Primarily a model dwelling for the King's spirit, the palace was also used by royalty on visits to western Thebes and exhibits a number of interesting ritual and domestic features. Source: Grove Art Online; http://www.groveart.com/ (accessed 1/18/2008)en_US
dc.format.mediumstone; sandstoneen_US
dc.rights© Scott Gilchrist, Archivision, Inc.en_US
dc.subjectarchitectural exteriorsen_US
dc.subjectdeitiesen_US
dc.subjectmilitaryen_US
dc.subjectwaren_US
dc.subjectrulers and leadersen_US
dc.subjectEgypt--Civilizationen_US
dc.subjectNew Kingdom (Egyptian)en_US
dc.subjectTwentieth Dynastyen_US
dc.titleGreat Temple of Ramesses IIIen_US
dc.title.alternativeMortuary Temple of Ramses IIIen_US
dc.typeimageen_US
dc.rights.accessLicensed for educational and research use by the MIT community onlyen_US
dc.identifier.vendorcode1A3-EG-T-TR-J3en_US
vra.culturalContextEgyptian (ancient)en_US
vra.techniqueconstruction (assembling) carving (processes)en_US
vra.worktypemortuary templeen_US
vra.worktypeexcavation (site)en_US
dc.contributor.displayunknown (Egyptian (ancient))en_US


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