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dc.coverage.spatialSite: Luxor (Thebes, Upper Egypt, Egypt)en_US
dc.coverage.temporalca. 1450 BCE-400 CE (inclusive)en_US
dc.creatorunknownen_US
dc.date-1450-400en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-17T19:13:18Z
dc.date.available2013-04-17T19:13:18Z
dc.date.issued-1450-400en_US
dc.identifier209501en_US
dc.identifier.otherarchrefid: 762en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.3/117381
dc.descriptionThe throne of the east (left) colossal statue of Ramesses II, the throne panel, detail at the base; Luxor [now al-Uqsr] is the site of a temple dedicated to the god Amun, on the east bank of the Nile, 3 km south of Karnak. It was constructed and decorated primarily during the reigns of Amenophis III [Amenhotep III] and Ramesses II [Ramses II] (reigned ca. 1279-ca. 1213 BCE). The earliest remains at the site date to the time of Hatshepsut, who built six way-stations for the bark of Amon-Re along the processional avenue bordered by sphinxes that connects Luxor and Karnak. The stone blocks of the southernmost way-station survive, reused in the triple bark shrine of Ramesses II. Amenophis III built the original stone Temple of Amun (known to the ancient Egyptians as Ipet-resyt) on a platform. He later added a court and laid the foundations for a colonnade which was completed and largely decorated by Tutankhamun (reigned ca. 1332-ca. 1323 BCE). Ramesses II added the first court and pylon. The sanctuary of the temple, in which the bark of Amun was placed, was rebuilt by Alexander the Great (reigned 332-323 BCE), with reliefs in typical early Ptolemaic style. From the 4th to the 6th century CE, the cult of the Roman emperors was celebrated in a decorated vestibule to which an apse was added. The Roman paintings, although still visible, are now severely damaged. Luxor was also considered to be the birthplace of Amon-Re, the aspect of Amun worshipped at Karnak. During the national observance of the Opet Feast, the world was thought to be regenerated and cosmic order re-established by the rites accompanying the annual rebirth of Amon-Re. These miracles were accomplished by the ritual renewal of divine kingship, symbolized first by the re-enactment of the reigning monarch's divine conception, which assured his possession of the royal ka (divine spirit), and second by the recrowning of the king, which confirmed the legitimacy of his reign. Source: Grove Art Online; http://www.groveart.com/ (accessed 1/15/2008)en_US
dc.format.mediumstone; graniteen_US
dc.rights© Scott Gilchrist, Archivision, Inc.en_US
dc.subjectarchitectural exteriorsen_US
dc.subjectdeitiesen_US
dc.subjectrulers and leadersen_US
dc.subjectAmenhotep III, King of Egypten_US
dc.subjectRamses II, King of Egypten_US
dc.subjectNew Kingdom (Egyptian)en_US
dc.subjectEgyptian (ancient)en_US
dc.titleLuxor Temple Complexen_US
dc.title.alternativeAmun Temple at al-Uqsren_US
dc.title.alternativeTemple of Amun, Luxoren_US
dc.typeimageen_US
dc.rights.accessLicensed for educational and research use by the MIT community onlyen_US
dc.identifier.vendorcode1A3-EG-LT-D11en_US
vra.culturalContextEgyptian (ancient)en_US
vra.techniqueconstruction (assembling) carving (processes)en_US
vra.worktypeexcavation (site)en_US
vra.worktypetempleen_US
vra.worktypepylonen_US
dc.contributor.displayunknown (Egyptian (ancient))en_US


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